Fashion, Commercial, Portrait and Head Shot Photographer

Born in Laguna, Philippines, Kris Fulk is a fashion and beauty photographer based in North Carolina. She immigrated to New York City when she was only 10 years old. In the fall of 2001, Kris was accepted into the fashion design program of the prestigious Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. Witnessing the fall of the Twin Towers during September 11, however, precipitated her enlistment into the United States Navy. She served as an aviation electrician’s mate, working on F/A 18s for four years until her honorable discharge at the age of 23. Since then she has graduated magna cum laude from St. Mary’s College of Southern Maryland with a Studio Art/ Art History degree focused on photography and illustration, and pursues her love for fashion and art through her camera.

For commissions or assignments, visit her website at
krisfulk.com or contact her via email at kris@krisfulk.com.

twitter facebook rss

How To Take A Portrait With Speedlites

October 30th, 2015

This morning I woke up thinking I forgot to account for Daylight Savings Time, and that I was actually late to work. I went from barely awake to “freak out mode” in the space of a heartbeat. Luckily, I use my cell phone for my alarm, and after breathing deeply a few times, I realized […]

Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

This morning I woke up thinking I forgot to account for Daylight Savings Time, and that I was actually late to work. I went from barely awake to “freak out mode” in the space of a heartbeat. Luckily, I use my cell phone for my alarm, and after breathing deeply a few times, I realized it was only Friday…

I can’t say this is the first time this has happened to me (I’m sure this has happened to everybody at least once in their lives!), but I’m glad I now have time to write this blog post. I’ve been meaning to write it for a while, too.

Working with speedlites is a little trickier than working with strobes. First, there is no modeling light, so you have to guess-timate on the light position until you get it right. When you’re new to off-camera light, this can take a few snaps, but the more you work with off-camera light, the faster you will get at setting up.

Second, you have two choices: should you shoot manual or ETTL? I find that for me, it is easier to shoot on manual because I am used to shooting with strobes. So using a light meter gives me faster results. However, some people find using ETTL to be easier, as ratios can be relatively easy to use. You tell your key light and your fill that you want a 1:3 ratio, and your flash and camera will give you the best exposure for your key light. The down side to ETTL is that you never really know how much light your putting out since the flash and the camera are thinking for you, whereas if you shoot manual, you tell the speedlite to shoot at, say, 1/64th flash power, and you know that it’s putting out that much light.

Another downside to shooting ETTL is that you need two devices in order to shoot. You will always need a master or commander to trigger your slaved off-camera flash. When you shoot manual, you can hard wire your speedlite to your camera, eliminating the need for a trigger.

I know what you’re wondering. What’s the upside to shooting ETTL?

Your master flash can tell your slaved flash what to do, and on some cameras, these controls are accessible on the camera itself. Imagine not having to go to your OCF to manually change settings. You can even control multiple speedlites, in different channels and different groups. That’s a pretty nice upside, if you ask me.

While we’re not going to go in-depth here, I do want to show you what is possible with speedlites, using two different modifiers, and how I positioned the lights.

My model is the super talented nail artist Sara Meas. You can find her work here.

One speedlite off-camera in a small Rapid Box modifier hard wired to my camera. I kept the light close to her to give it that specular but beauty dish look. Keeping the light close also throws the background into darkness due to the extreme light fall off of a small modifier and the backdrop being 4 feet away. Any light spill on the backdrop can be easily burned away in post.

Using two speedlites both off-camera, I was able to put the key light, which was in an Apollo Orb modifier, up high directly in front of the subject. See the last picture below for the lighting position. The kicker was in the Rapid Box, feathered a little behind her so that the light wasn’t too harsh. The key light here is also lighting the backdrop.

You can see the position of the key light in the catchlights in her eyes.

The lighting set up. A speedlite inside a 26″ Westcott Rapid Box provided the kicker light. A speedlite up high and directly across the model in a Westcott Apollo Orb. A silver reflector on camera left. The backdrop was Emily Soto’s “Eleanor” painted muslin from Seamless.

If you’d like to see what the Orb and Rapid Box looks like upon un-boxing, I created these two videos to show you how easy it is to set up.

I hope this post inspired you to whip out your speedlites this weekend! Let me know what you think in the comments below.

Retouch by Kris Fulk and Eduardo Calvo.

breaker

How to take a simple self-portrait for the technically challenged

September 9th, 2015

I photograph people. Yet as a photographer, I don’t normally photograph myself. I think it takes a very special artist to specialize in self-portraits, like Brooke Shaden, whose work is unearthly and gorgeous. Whereas for me, I am my worst enemy, because I simply can’t take myself seriously and often feel foolish. I would rather have someone else photograph me, since […]


Posted in: the nitty gritty
Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

I photograph people. Yet as a photographer, I don’t normally photograph myself. I think it takes a very special artist to specialize in self-portraits, like Brooke Shaden, whose work is unearthly and gorgeous. Whereas for me, I am my worst enemy, because I simply can’t take myself seriously and often feel foolish. I would rather have someone else photograph me, since I understand how important it is to have professional images for our profiles. All of this is to say that I find self-portraits very challenging, so if you’re going to do this challenge, here are some tips for you.

krisfulkphotography-selfportrait

The final cropped image. ISO 400, Sigma 50 1.4, f /4, 1/160 sec

Scout for a location that is simple and have little to no foot traffic. (I feel foolish enough; I most certainly do not want other people in on the show!) I chose the dappled white door of my garage as a backdrop. The sunlight falls through the leaves in the afternoon and gives some interest to the otherwise plain door. Unfortunately for me, the minute I came outside, a hornet decided to give chase and I ended up with a painful sting on my leg. (It’s gotten a lot less swollen now, thank goodness.)

krisfulkphotography-selfportrait-3

The light stand I used to help me focus.

I chose the 50 mm  focal length so that I have some room to crop. I have the 135L and the 24-70L but I wanted to be as simple as possible here. I knew that I wanted a wider aperture for some bokeh, and though I love my 135L, nailing the focus would have been so much harder since as the focal length increases, the depth of the plane of focus decreases. The 24-70L would have just been heavy since I wanted to stay at 50mm (anything wider than that and I was going to start dealing with distortion, and again, anything longer than 50mm and I was dealing with a thinner plane of focus.)

Before getting myself ready, I made sure to bring all the things I figured I’d need. The temperature was in the 90s, the high side and I didn’t want to start sweating when I was ready to take the picture. I brought a light stand, reflector, a step stool, a fan, my tripod and camera bag. This would have been easier with my wireless shutter release, but I didn’t have it at the time, so I had to get friendly with my camera timer.

I eyeballed the composition and set my light stand to where I would sit or stand, making sure to use my middle focus point so that it was a bit more accurate. I set the my lens to manual focus so the focus wouldn’t shift. Then I moved the light stand and I approximated about where I had set the focus plane and did a few light tests.

krisfulkphotography-selfportrait-2

One of the light tests I took to assess where the light was falling.

Right away I could tell that my eyes were shadowed. It was only four o’clock in the afternoon so the sun was still a bit high and bright, and raccoon eyes were inevitable. Luckily, I had thought ahead and brought my reflector, which I propped on the stool (I decided I would instead stand since I needed the stool to prop up the reflector.)

Now that I had my set up ready, I changed into the turtleneck I was determined to wear — why I chose to wear a black spanx-like turtleneck in that heat, I don’t know… probably because it screamed “Look at me, I’m an Artist! Where’s my beret?”

For the next thirty minutes, I used the timer on my camera and ran to where I thought the focus was set and…did things. Like walk across or jump up and down. At one point I held up the fan and started singing to it, “Coz youuuu… LIGHT UP MY LIFE! You gave ME hope! To carry onnnnn!” Leann Rhimes would have been so proud. Luckily, I also decided to just stand there and smile (inwardly laughing at my foolishness, of course) and that helped the focus a lot. So I ended up getting this shot.

I'm an Artist. Where's my beret?

I’m an Artist. Where’s my beret?

And it’s fine, but I also cropped it in Lightroom a bit since I didn’t like where my hands cropped here. The stars aligned for me and the composition I had envisioned worked perfectly! My eyes are right where the horizontal line on the garage door is and I’m bracketed by the vertical lines. This is why when you scout your location, you need to look at everything that could be in the shot, and plan your composition accordingly.

It was a lot of running back and forth, but I’m really happy with this self-portrait!

Will you take up the challenge? I’d love to see what you create, so leave a link below. And as usual, if you have any questions, just ask!

 

K

breaker

How one, two, and three lights look in the studio

August 20th, 2015

A couple of weeks ago, I had the beautiful Saoirse (Modelogic) in my studio. I had a couple of lighting scenarios I wanted to test, and she had the perfect face for it: starting with one light all the way to three. One light is so easy to work with. If you look at my […]

Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

A couple of weeks ago, I had the beautiful Saoirse (Modelogic) in my studio. I had a couple of lighting scenarios I wanted to test, and she had the perfect face for it: starting with one light all the way to three.

One light is so easy to work with. If you look at my last post about clam shell lighting, you can definitely achieve a nice glowing light with the help of a reflector.

Clam shell lighting with one Einstein head in a MOLA Demi beauty dish and reflector.

I really love how the MOLA Demi lights the skin. There’s a certain specularity to the highlights that are super pretty. You’ll notice that I use it a lot. It’s the pecans on my ice cream sundae — that’s how much I love this beauty dish.

Needless to say, I kept the beauty dish up for this second set of images. I also whipped out my Elinchrom D-Lite RX One head, which I had won from Elinchrom and blogged a review here, complete with a 20 degree grid. I don’t grid much so this one took some getting used to. I think for next time, I would like to use 30 or 40 degree grid as well.

MOLA Demi beauty dish on the key light and one gridded Elinchrom head on the backdrop. No reflector.

MOLA Demi beauty dish on the key light and one gridded Elinchrom head on the backdrop. No reflector.

You can see the difference between the first image (with reflector) and the second image (without reflector) on the shadows. Where it was softer on the first, it had a crispness in the second.

Lastly, I wanted to try this three light set up that I had seen from Clay Cook. It’s not really complicated: I clam shelled her face with the beauty dish and an Elinchrom head in a reflector, the first on the bottom pointing up and the second above her head pointing down. Then I slapped a large octabox on my Elinchrom Quadra head and positioned it 45 degrees on camera left. This is the key light giving her face a beautiful glow, while the clamshell lifts the shadows.

Three light set-up producing soft shadows.

For visual reference, this is what the pull back looks like.

Three light set up, behind the scenes. Octabox on camera left, clam shell lighting provided by a reflectored head and a beauty dish.

Credits:

Photography, hair and makeup by me.

Retouch by Eduardo Calvo.

 

I hope you’ve found this post helpful! If you do try any of these lighting scenarios, let me know how it went! And as usual, drop me a line on the comments if you have any questions or feedback.

 

K

breaker

Why you should get to know “clamshell” lighting

July 26th, 2015

When I started shooting in the studio, I had a garage, one light and one reflector. I call this the poor photographer’s studio 🙂 But honestly, most of us start this way. You’d be surprised how many looks you can get with this simple setup, and one of these configurations is called “clamshell lighting.” What is clamshell and […]

Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

When I started shooting in the studio, I had a garage, one light and one reflector. I call this the poor photographer’s studio 🙂 But honestly, most of us start this way. You’d be surprised how many looks you can get with this simple setup, and one of these configurations is called “clamshell lighting.”

What is clamshell and why do you need to know about it?

First, it is easy to do. Put your light source close to the model, directly in front and slightly above, tilted down. Now set a reflector directly below, at about the waist or chest level of your model. And that’s it! Of course you need to adjust the tilt or the height of your light source depending on how diffused you want your light (or maybe you want to deepen the direction of your shadows?), or move your reflector’s height depending on how soft you want the reflected light —  but as you can see, it’s a pretty straightforward set up.

Second, because it lifts the shadows, you do get this beautiful glowing light.

You’ll see this light in a lot of fashion and beauty campaigns. Just look at the catchlights in the models’ eyes.

Here’s an example from a recent shoot (which was recently featured in the Mola blog) where I used one Einstein head in a Mola Demi beauty dish and one reflector. The beauty dish was about two feet in front of the model.

 

Credits:

Photographer, hair and makeup by me.

Model: Annie Bray

Retoucher: Siyana Kasabova

 

I hope you’ve found this post helpful! If you try clamshell, let me know how it went! And as usual, drop me a line on the comments if you have any questions or feedback.

 

K

breaker

Light test and review: Elinchrom D-Lite RX ONE portalite kit

March 25th, 2015

A few months ago, Elinchrom hosted a contest during Photokina week on social media. Believe it or not, I was the only winner from Instagram and, a couple of weeks later, I received my Elinchrom D-Lite RX ONE To-Go Set on my doorstep. With a wide grin — I’m not ashamed to admit that I was […]

Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

A few months ago, Elinchrom hosted a contest during Photokina week on social media. Believe it or not, I was the only winner from Instagram and, a couple of weeks later, I received my Elinchrom D-Lite RX ONE To-Go Set on my doorstep. With a wide grin — I’m not ashamed to admit that I was squealing like a five year old with a Christmas present — I lugged the huge box into my studio and unpacked it right into Instagram.

What struck me the most was how light and portable this kit is. The light housing is plastic and the portalite softboxes are simple. I was a bit afraid the softbox material wouldn’t hold up to much usage, but I can honestly say that it’s really good quality (it’s Elinchrom after all). However, you do have to take the portalites apart if you want to stick them back into the travel case. Luckily, it’s not that hard to do, unlike its more expensive – but more beautiful – big brother, the Rotalux Octas. If you’ve ever assembled a fresh out of the box Rotalux Octabox, you know what gymnastic feat it is to wrestle the stiff rods into place. Granted, you only really have to do that the first time you assemble it, and I can honestly say I love my Rotaluxes for the beautiful way they shape the light. But I digress…

As you can see, the D-Lite RX One To-Go Set comes with everything you need to start a shoot right out of the box, or more accurately, the travel case and stand bag.  You get two lights, two portalite softboxes, two tripods, and one Skyport trigger. Each flash head boasts only 100 w/s, so it’s important to note that this set is a great starter kit for photographers who are new to studio light. While I love my Quadra, I can see that this set is a great alternative for simple head shot or portrait assignments. To that end, I put it to use to see what quality of light it can produce on the lovely Macy Pavelock.

For the first two images, I decided to do a tight head shot. One D-Lite on camera left with two reflectors, one on camera right and one under her chin on the chest area.

ISO 160 135mm f/5 1/160sec

 

Turning her face away from the light source fills her face on camera right with some shadows. While I’m looking at the light, I also want to see what quality of shadow is produced.

ISO 160 135mm f/5 1/160sec

 

For the second set of images, I added a second light. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find the cord for the second D-Lite (facepalm!), so I had to power on my Quadra with the 53″ Octa attached to a boom, and then flag it with the 4×6 reflector on camera right so only a sliver of light touched the model. (I love it when I have to think on my feet!) The backdrop I used is my Eleanor muslin from Seamless designed by Emily Soto, which is a hand painted silvery blue color that I had already laid out for a previous shoot (I’ll link it here when I blog that shoot). I positioned Macy about 4-5 feet in front of it. With the portalite softbox being only 66mm, I was afraid that the light would produce too much contrast for wider shots (it did), and being that small and close to the subject, the quick light fall off changed the backdrop color to black. Notice the sharpness of the shadows on the side of the nose? Even slightly feathered, the light is crispy, so you have to be aware with placing anything closer to the light, like, say her hand and arm, as they may get too much illumination. Though I moved the key light farther outside of the frame, I still wanted it to be as close as possible to the subject so the light is as soft as possible. I did, however, take away the second reflector that I had under her face.

ISO 160 135mm f/5 1/160sec

 

Here I moved the light a little bit closer so that it’s even softer. Look at the difference in shadow quality on her nose. There is a “glowiness” to the light that I loved because of that pop from the contrast.

ISO 160 135mm f/5 1/160sec

Conclusion: While the D-Lite is lightweight and small, it has enough punch to start out your studio photography. It is very liberating knowing you can take this anywhere that has a power outlet. I would, however, remind you that it does have its limits. It’s only 100 ws and the portalites are small, so the quality of light can have too much contrast if you’re not careful at placement. Perhaps the next step for you to expand your kit is to purchase a bigger sized softbox or venture into the Rotalux Octabox territory when you start pushing the limits of what this kit can do. As for me, I still can’t believe I won a whole kit! Or, honestly, that I won anything 🙂 I’ve been really happy with it as it supplemented my already portable Quadra, and since I’m invested in the Elinchrom family, I can use my Rotalux diffusers when necessary. Thank you, Elinchrom!

breaker

Starting my new year with make-up

January 20th, 2015

When I was 15, one of my aunts wanted me to go to Cosmetology school. I put make-up on everybody — even on the styrofoam head where she put her wig! Fast forward to being a photographer and you start to see just how important make-up truly is. A good understanding of the basics of make-up application […]


Posted in: the nitty gritty
Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

When I was 15, one of my aunts wanted me to go to Cosmetology school. I put make-up on everybody — even on the styrofoam head where she put her wig! Fast forward to being a photographer and you start to see just how important make-up truly is. A good understanding of the basics of make-up application will help you when you’re just starting out, specially when you’re just shooting friends or looking to test with models and you’re doing the makeup yourself. Honestly, when I built my fashion portfolio and I didn’t have a budget, I did the make-up on my friends. But I know some of my male photographer friends just starting out who scratch their heads and confess that they know absolutely nothing about it. Look, it’s not all glitz and glamour, so you don’t have to stress out that you are not familiar with these fancy techniques you see on Instagram.

For example, for testing, you need a clean face, so if you light it correctly, or if you’re model has great skin, or if you’re retouching level is more than average, yada yada, you may be able to get away with minimal make-up. For editorial looks, I would, however, definitely advice you to wait till you have a make-up artist in your team. A good make-up artist is gold.

Also, understanding make-up can help your retouching techniques. Renowned photographer and retoucher Julia Kuzmenko, for example, posted an image on Facebook of a contouring make-up how-to illustration that she found in a department store. (Or maybe it was in Sephora, I can’t quite recall exactly.) Anyway, she advised the retouchers following her to really study where the contour and highlights were applied so they could understand dodging and burning. Where does the light hit the face and where are the shadows? It’s super important to understand the effects of light in an image, specially if you’re doing beauty.

So of course I jumped on the chance to go to celebrity make-up artist Marisa Ross‘s workshop when I found out that she was coming to Charlotte! As a bonus, guest educator Morgan Marin also taught us how to achieve a bronzed look on Marisa after Marisa worked on the model.

Now before I start the barrage of images, I need to tell you that I was in the front. Quite literally right in front of the make-up chair. Just in case you’re wondering why the angle is pointing up.

Ok, here goes.

We started with a clean look. Marisa demonstrated her techniques in applying foundation, contour, eyebrows and lipstick, and explained how she will layer more products for later looks to ensure a quick workflow. Note: if you’re doing a beauty story or an editorial, this is a good way to conserve time!

Look 2 kicked up the clean face another notch by adding a custom mixed berry lip.

Look 3 added some more contour, eye makeup and layered a color on her lips to make it pinker.

Look 4 deepened the eye colors and contouring.

Final look with a darker lip and contour, and is something Marisa would create for an editorial shoot.

There was a 15 minute break, and right before I ran to the bathroom (I had been chugging down coffee during my 1.5 hour drive as well as during the beginning of the class), I turned and captured the other girls in my class.

After the brief break and the Q&A, Marisa became Morgan’s model. Morgan is shown below taking Marisa’s barely there base make-up into a bronzed “JLo” look.

A bronzed look for the daytime. I actually got up to take these next shots.

Then a couple of Ardell lashes, deeper eyeshadows, a winged liner, and a slight emphasis on the lips, and Marisa’s JLo went into Kim K territory.

If you’re a make-up enthusiast (like me) or a photographer interested in getting a good foundation for makeup (pun intended), I highly recommend signing up for Marisa’s workshop. Just in case you’re not in Atlanta or Charlotte, I’m sure if you holler at her on Facebook or Instagram, she might come visit your city. I learned a lot, guys. From the way you windshield wipe an eyeshadow on the eye to business aspects, it was so worth it for me.

Anyway, if you have any questions or comments, please ask. And if you’re going to link to the images in this post, please link back to me 🙂

PS. What are you doing to start your new year?

 

breaker

Finding inspiration

August 13th, 2014

I’m one of those people who get inspired by looking at other people’s work. My Instagram is full of beautiful photography, not just fashion and beauty but portraits and slices of life as well. I love looking at work by Emily Soto, Lara Jade, Zhang Jingna, Luke Copping, Sue Bryce, Mario Testino, and of course, […]


Posted in: personal
Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

I’m one of those people who get inspired by looking at other people’s work. My Instagram is full of beautiful photography, not just fashion and beauty but portraits and slices of life as well. I love looking at work by Emily Soto, Lara Jade, Zhang Jingna, Luke Copping, Sue Bryce, Mario Testino, and of course, the great Annie Liebovitz. There are more, but just to name some.

I like to see what makes their images unique to them, and how they use light, color and composition. I like to see how they process the images.

But sometimes, amidst the appreciation of their works, doubt starts to set in.

“I’ll never be that good.”

“I’ll never be good enough.”

And then I go days without looking at photographs. It may even take me weeks to get inspired to pick up my camera again.

So… I learned to STOP. I’m only human. I’ve found that it’s ok to NOT look at other people’s photography ALL THE TIME. If it makes you feel bad, stop it. Find other things that inspire.

I listen to Christina Perri. Have you ever heard her song Human? It grounds me when I start getting that feeling. Also, the music video is so simple yet the use of lighting, focus and superimposition of human, skeleton and mechanical elements are all beautiful.

I absolutely love the movie What Dreams May Come. You can watch a trailer on IMDB. This is, to me, one of the late great Robin Williams’ finest performance. He plays a man who’ve lost his family in an accident and looks for them in the afterlife, a journey full of gorgeous scenes, most of which were inspired by famous paintings. Such a feast for the eyes.

I was sad to see that Studio Ghibli has closed. If you’ve never seen the movies they produced with Hayao Miyazaki, you’re in for such a treat. Here’s the trailer for Howl’s Moving Castle, which is based on a book by Diana Wynn Jones. There are others (Spirited Away, Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, and Laputa Castle in the Sky, just to name a few more. But Howl’s is my favorite.)

 

 

Comic books and superhero movies inspire me. I have a trunk full of Witchblade, Xmen, Fathom and Wildcats comic books. Some of which have second copies because the first have an authenticated seal so I can’t open them – yes, I’m that nerdy 🙂 What a glorious couple of decades we live in, what with all the superhero movies that have come out and those that are still in the works.

 

 

Sometimes I get inspired by a model’s face, and to me that is one of the best kinds of inspiration. I feel so energized looking at the images I created. This one’s from my last shoot.

Model Brittany Algiere of DirectionsUSA.

krisfulkphotography-brittany-WEB-4

krisfulkphotography-brittany-WEB

krisfulkphotography-brittany-WEB-2

 

What are you inspired by? I know some photographers don’t even look at other photographers’ works, and if that’s you, I’d love to hear from you as well!

breaker

Speedlite Workshop | Winston-Salem, NC

August 11th, 2014

I’m so excited to announce my first class! As a fashion and beauty photographer, I love my strobes and my big modifiers. But when I first got into photography many years ago, and subsequently when I started to shoot weddings and portraits in the first phase of my photography career, speedlites and lightweight gear were […]


Posted in: workshops
Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

I’m so excited to announce my first class! As a fashion and beauty photographer, I love my strobes and my big modifiers. But when I first got into photography many years ago, and subsequently when I started to shoot weddings and portraits in the first phase of my photography career, speedlites and lightweight gear were my best friends. And even today, in a pinch, I can still supplement my gear with my speedlites when needed.

It’s so essential to learn how to use your flash, specially if you’re thinking about doing wedding or portrait photography. You just never know what kind of light you’ll have, so I always say over-prepared is better prepared. If you don’t like the light you HAVE, then it’s easy to create your own light once you know your tools. So here are the details.

 

When: October 5, 2014, Sunday

Where: The venue will be disclosed to the students beforehand

Time: Noon

How much: $75/student

Maximum number of students: 15

What to bring: your camera, your flash and note taking implements

 

 What we will talk about:

– Seeing the existing light and when to use flash

– Anatomy of a speedlite

  • Flash exposure compensation
  • High-speed, first and rear curtain syncs
  • Manual mode
  • ETTL mode
  • Ratios

– Using on-camera flash and modifiers

– Using off-camera flash and modifiers

– Hard wired versus wireless triggers/receivers

– The joys of using multiple speedlites

– Problem solving different scenarios with both on- and off-camera lights

I shoot Canon, and although I will be showing you with my Canon equipment, the functions of speedlites and lighting principles are the same. To make it easier for you, be sure to familiarize yourself with the locations of your speedlite controls by reading and/or bringing your manual. You will leave this class confident of what your speedlite can do and what you can do with your speedlite so that you can have more creative control of the images you create. Ultimately, the knowledge you take away will be priceless.

 

Does this class sound like it’s for you? There are only going to be 15 seats, so please register as early as you can by contacting me at kris@krisfulk.com.

PS. My main goal is to eventually host fashion/beauty workshops with models from local agencies and a whole creative team so that you can see/participate in an actual photoshoot. We’re starting from the very basic here in October, so if you’d like to stay in the know about future classes, email me and/or like my Facebook Page.

 

breaker

The importance of digitals and simplicity

July 31st, 2014

If you’re a model just getting into the business or a photographer starting out with your fashion/beauty portfolio, you might be overlooking simple styling. I see a lot of images shared in Facebook groups with glitter, avant garde make-up and outfits, but when I cast models, the first thing I look for are their digitals […]


Posted in: fashion
Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

If you’re a model just getting into the business or a photographer starting out with your fashion/beauty portfolio, you might be overlooking simple styling. I see a lot of images shared in Facebook groups with glitter, avant garde make-up and outfits, but when I cast models, the first thing I look for are their digitals or simple images from their tests. Why? Because I want to see what *you* look like. Without the glitz and makeup from someone else’s shoot. I want to envision you in *my* shoot and not necessarily see what another photographer has done. It might actually be detrimental to you if you haven’t worked with professional photographers, and your only images have bad retouching and color shifts.

Clients do the same thing. They want to see how you would fit with their product or brand. We can always request your portfolio, but we start with looking at simple shots of you.

krisfulkphotography-hannah-web-3

Hannah | DirectionsUSA

IMG_9550-Edit

Kasey | PageParkes

IMG_9536-Edit

Kasey | PageParkes

If you’re a new model, or a non-agency represented one, chances are you have tons of over-stylized images. Ask your photographer to grab a few before the crazy hair and make-up. You can always ask the MUA to do your base make-up, add some blush and mascara first and you’re good to go. If you’re a photographer, hook your model up with these images before you start your shoot. It’s easy and quick, and will help their book immensely.

breaker

The Brenizer Method

May 8th, 2014

A couple of days ago, I was able to play around with the Brenizer method during Catherine and Alex’s maternity portraits. If you’re not familiar with this method, you essentially use a long focal length at a wide, if not the widest, aperture to take several shots that you then stitch in Photoshop. The resulting […]


Posted in: the nitty gritty
Expand Close
| Comments | See Full Post
 

A couple of days ago, I was able to play around with the Brenizer method during Catherine and Alex’s maternity portraits. If you’re not familiar with this method, you essentially use a long focal length at a wide, if not the widest, aperture to take several shots that you then stitch in Photoshop. The resulting image then gives you a much wider field of view with a very small depth of field.

cat-maternity-brenizer-method-krisfulk-2

The above example is comprised of 5-6 shots. I used a 135L on a 5d2 at f2.

cat-maternity-brenizer-method-krisfulk

This second image is what the shot would have looked like normally without the Brenizer method. Notice  that the subjects fill more of the frame and there is less background. This is the field of view and depth of field from the 135mm lens.

You can also use this for a more intimate portrait. For example, this is what Casey looks like with a 5-6 shot Brenizer method inside the studio using the same exact specs as Cat and Alex’s portrait, though it looks like it was shot with a 50mm.

casey-brenizer

Meanwhile, a normal shot with the 135L looks like this below. I did move the light to the right, by the way.

casey-krisfulkphotography

Suffice to say that I have learned a lot from these two shoots and have far from mastered this method. In theory, it seems relatively simple, but here are a few things for you to remember so that you don’t make the same mistakes that I did:

1. Use the auto exposure lock on your subject before taking the next few shots.

2. If you don’t like using the AE lock, you can focus on your subject and then set your lens to manual focus. If you do this, however, make sure that you set your white balance from the beginning.

3. This is the method I used, which takes longer and I cant really recommend it. Tell your subject not to move, then focus on them and recompose for every shot. Again, make sure your WB is set.

4. How many images you take is up to you, but having a composition in mind will help guide you in the direction of the shots. Since these were my first tries, I found that keeping it simple and centered worked best.

I hope this helps you, and do share  your own images using the Brenizer method in the comments so I can see what you did.